Laura Beltran-Rubio

Laura Beltran-Rubio is a fashion historian and creative consultant. She has a Master of Arts in Fashion Studies from Parsons School of Design, specializing in the fashion history of Europe and the Americas from the 18th through the 20th century. Her work has been published in both academic journals and online. When she is not working on her own academic research, or teaching courses in the history of art and design, Laura can be found conducting research at the Department of Drawings and Prints of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, cataloging designs for garments, jewelry, and textiles. @laurabelru

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf GoodmanChristmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

Christmas in Bergdorf Goodman

We all know how much I love Bergdorf Goodman—mostly their window displays—so of course I had to go and take pictures of their wonderfully-decorated Christmas windows. I really, really love the theme they chose for this year’s displays—the arts—and I absolutely adored the result. My photos really don’t do justice to the beauty of the displays, so if you happen to be in New York this season, you should totally go see them yourself—and do some shopping as well, naturally!

I actually do walk past BG quite a lot, and every single time I see their window displays it’s as if it was the first time. Maybe I just become a 5-year-old at this time of the year… And I think this is actually fun. It makes me enjoy the holidays more than if I was trying to be a serious adult. And it makes me happy!

"Helena Rubinstein: Beauty is Power" at the Jewish Museum

Helena Rubinstein at the Jewish Museum

I went yesterday to the Jewish Museum to see the exhibition Helena Rubinstein: Beauty is Power. Although it showed a wonderful array of the artwork collected by Rubinstein throughout her life––including some beautiful portraits of her by the most relevant artists of her time, amazing sculptures from Gabon, and a few of her miniature rooms, which I totally want to have in my home—I must say that the exhibition was far less than I expected.

I arrived to the exhibition because I have to write a review about it as part of my Fashion History coursework… So I did expect some fashion. And although the exhibition contained a wonderful Bolero jacket by Elsa Schiaparelli—which is probably one of my favourite garments from the designer, only because I am obsessed with elephants—that was pretty much it. No fashion at all…

But what is even more surprising is the lack of talk about beauty. Being Rubinstein the absolute beauty master, I really expected to see more beauty-related content, and not just a few seconds of her advertising videos at the end, and less than a dozen samples of her beauty products. Although the curator did seem to admire Rubinstein for being a genius marketer and challenging the stigma associated with makeup in the early twentieth century, these issues were left mostly untouched, and nothing other than her art collections was shown.

I’ve experienced this kind of bias—showing Jewish “heroes” without elaborating on the reasons for their importance—in the past at the Jewish Museum, it hit me harder this time. As much as I value Jewish pride—or any type of pride, to be honest—I also like arguments with a basis. And I like going to museums to learn and be informed… Something I feel lacked this time.

I did enjoy seeing the beautiful portraits, though… And the art, especially when artworks from Picasso, Kahlo and Miro were juxtaposed to tribal sculptures from Nepal, Gabon and Ivory Coast. Oh, and the beautiful creations that Rubinstein’s collection of miniature rooms are—trust me, they are breathtaking! I really recommend paying a visit to the museum if you’re interested in any of these… But if you want to learn about this genius of the beauty industry, I wouldn’t say this is the place to go.

Empire State Of Mind

New York, March 2014

I finally made it to New York. New York! I’ve been dreaming of this for so long, that I wouldn’t be able to tell you exactly when it all started. But here I am, freshly landed, with my two bags—that are just about to explode—and a heart full of unimaginable dreams. It hasn’t been an easy process, and I don’t think it will start becoming easier soon. As one of my friends recently told me: to make your dreams come true, you have to work very hard. But that’s definitely a risk I’m willing to take. If I hadn’t taken some risks and worked hard from the beginning, I probably wouldn’t be here, in my temporary Upper West Side home, writing about finally living in New York.

Although it was my hard work on college—very relevant here because I’m a grad student now—and all the enthusiasm I put in my application to both school and my scholarship program that brought me here, there are also some small things that I’m pretty sure helped a lot.

I would say the most important one was having in mind what I wanted to do from the beginning. I realised today when I went shopping for an agenda for the semester how picky I am with such a small thing. I spent hours searching and visited more than one place to actually find one that screamed my name when I saw it.

This whole process made me remember it was exactly the same last year. I was starting my last year in college, and the only agenda that seemed to satisfy my needs—which I guess go far beyond writing my homework and to-do lists—was one of New York. And I realised that seeing New York—and having it metaphorically in my hands—every day made me understand how important it was to me to make the move.

Then came the applications and all that stuff. But I’m absolutely certain that the most important part was to understand what I wanted and just go for it, no matter if people around me thought I was crazy or wrong. I had faith in making my dreams come true and moving to New York. And faith—as I recently read—by nature, is persistent. Persistence, by nature, is single-minded. Single-mindedness, by nature, achieves the end it seeks.

Now that I achieved my first objective—arriving in New York—I have to start following the next. It is now my responsibility to show myself what I’m capable of and start making all of my wildest dreams come true. The first one would be finding the perfect home. And then comes finding the perfect research position. I’ll keep you updated on how that goes.